I Have No Idea What I'm Doing

browdernetwork:

Ben Browder starring in DEAD STILL - October 6, 2014 on SyFy

Be sure to check out DEAD STILL’s facebook page for more info.

blogblogblooog:

free at last.. by MariusSocaci

blogblogblooog:

free at last.. by MariusSocaci

sorcerersskull:

Art by Moebius

sorcerersskull:

Art by Moebius

10 plays

lospaziobianco:

by Asaf Hanuka

showmethebike:

fabbricadellabici:

Dan Craven at La Vuelta.
pelotonmagazine’s photo on Instagram


Beard
descentintotyranny:

The CIA’s Mop-Up Man: L.A. Times Reporter Cleared Stories With Agency Before Publication
Sep. 4 2014
A prominent national security reporter for the Los Angeles Times routinely submitted drafts and detailed summaries of his stories to CIA press handlers prior to publication, according to documents obtained by The Intercept.
Email exchanges between CIA public affairs officers and Ken Dilanian, now an Associated Press intelligence reporter who previously covered the CIA for the Times, show that Dilanian enjoyed a closely collaborative relationship with the agency, explicitly promising positive news coverage and sometimes sending the press office entire story drafts for review prior to publication. In at least one instance, the CIA’s reaction appears to have led to significant changes in the story that was eventually published in the Times.
“I’m working on a story about congressional oversight of drone strikes that can present a good opportunity for you guys,” Dilanian wrote in one email to a CIA press officer, explaining that what he intended to report would be “reassuring to the public” about CIA drone strikes. In another, after a series of back-and-forth emails about a pending story on CIA operations in Yemen, he sent a full draft of an unpublished report along with the subject line, “does this look better?” In another, he directly asks the flack: “You wouldn’t put out disinformation on this, would you?”
Read More

descentintotyranny:

The CIA’s Mop-Up Man: L.A. Times Reporter Cleared Stories With Agency Before Publication

Sep. 4 2014

A prominent national security reporter for the Los Angeles Times routinely submitted drafts and detailed summaries of his stories to CIA press handlers prior to publication, according to documents obtained by The Intercept.

Email exchanges between CIA public affairs officers and Ken Dilanian, now an Associated Press intelligence reporter who previously covered the CIA for the Times, show that Dilanian enjoyed a closely collaborative relationship with the agency, explicitly promising positive news coverage and sometimes sending the press office entire story drafts for review prior to publication. In at least one instance, the CIA’s reaction appears to have led to significant changes in the story that was eventually published in the Times.

“I’m working on a story about congressional oversight of drone strikes that can present a good opportunity for you guys,” Dilanian wrote in one email to a CIA press officer, explaining that what he intended to report would be “reassuring to the public” about CIA drone strikes. In another, after a series of back-and-forth emails about a pending story on CIA operations in Yemen, he sent a full draft of an unpublished report along with the subject line, “does this look better?” In another, he directly asks the flack: “You wouldn’t put out disinformation on this, would you?”

Read More

kuatdriveyards:

Fucking sick head badge

kuatdriveyards:

Fucking sick head badge

texts-from-disney:

[Image: Claude Frollo from The Hunchback of Notre Dame, hunched over with his teeth gritted.]
(407): How much do souls cost? I feel like I need one if those.

texts-from-disney:

[Image: Claude Frollo from The Hunchback of Notre Dame, hunched over with his teeth gritted.]

(407): How much do souls cost? I feel like I need one if those.

He had never wanted to be a wizard. He’d never wanted much, except perhaps to be left alone and not woken up until midday. When he’d been small, people had said things like, ‘And what do you want to be, little man?’ and he’d said, ‘I don’t know. What have you got?’

They didn’t let you get away with that sort of thing for very long. It wasn’t enough to be what you were, you had to be working to be something else.

 Terry Pratchett, Moving Pictures (via discworldquotes)
geekygothgirl:

jmiah0192:

Japanese child actress Mana Ashida (little Mako) was embarrassed that she couldn’t pronounce Guillermo Del Toro’s name so he gave her special permission to call him “Totoro-san” instead.
My Neighbor Guillermo Del Toro.

If I don’t reblog this, assume I’m dead.

geekygothgirl:

jmiah0192:

Japanese child actress Mana Ashida (little Mako) was embarrassed that she couldn’t pronounce Guillermo Del Toro’s name so he gave her special permission to call him “Totoro-san” instead.

My Neighbor Guillermo Del Toro.

If I don’t reblog this, assume I’m dead.

rivbike:

The Sam in many ways, a few ways, is the best all-around bike we’ve ever made. It’s not better than the Homer, but it costs like $1,000 to $1,300 less, and that has to count. It came after the Homer, so benefited from things learned from the Homer.

They ride identically enough that I can’t tell which bike I’m on.  I have a Homer-on-the-big side for me (a rare 60), and a Sam-on-big-side, a 56. They both fit fine, I ride them the same amount, both are set up alike, and when I’m not looking I can’t tell, and at any point on any ride I might not even know. This was the plan—to make the Sam ride like the Homer.

The second top tube doesn’t hurt anything. It must make the bike laterally stiffer, better for touring with a load, but since I have my Atlantis for that, I don’t put the 2TT to the test.

The Sam’s made in Taiwan. The SOUND of those syllables isn’t musical, but that it’s not musical is —- because we associate, still, deep down and from years of seeing it plastered on toys and junk, those same words.

I’ve been to many bike shops and factories, from one-manners to Bridgestone, with maybe seven others in between. Panasonic, Wford, Match, Toyo, and many small custom shops. They’re all impressive in their way, but none is more impressive than the one that makes the Sam. It’s big enough to require efficiency. There’s no pipe-smoking gnomes contemplating the next hand-miter there, but there’s also no rush. The floor is the cleanest I’ve ever seen. Each operation has a specialist who learns perfection by repetition, exactly the way you want your surgeon to learn it. There’s no sign of rushing, just of no wasted movements, no backtracking an oops, or anything like that. The frames are checked for alignment at various stages, and there are in-house testing machines that use hydraulics and computers to replicate specific tests.

Even if you don’t ask for test results (we do), they test the frames, because they’re in the loop and they want to know. It’s a comforting level of concern, and not at all what you might expect when you think of a “Taiwan bike factory.”

-G